Archive for the 07.Fixation and Incubation Category

My Project Idea – Photo-centric Multimedia Authoring

Posted in 05.Creativity and Design, 07.Fixation and Incubation, Uncategorized on March 9, 2010 by Chowhownd
With the increasing use of digital imaging in general consumer applications, there is a great deal of interest in developing new products that increase the value and enjoyment level of viewing digital images in consumers’ living rooms.
One way to enrich image viewing and sharing is to combine images with voice annotation and music.
A system should be developed for multimedia authoring, centered around and driven by still photos, with an emphasis on composing still images with sound, including music and spoken annotations. We describe the overall system, as well as major enabling technology components, including multimedia authoring, semantic image classification, and cross-media indexing.
The finished multimedia bit stream is primarily recorded on DVD or VCD to facilitate enriched enjoyment through a TV set, but can also be shared on a desktop/laptop, via email, or online.


With the increasing use of digital imaging in general consumer applications, there is a great deal of interest in developing new products that increase the value and enjoyment level of viewing digital images in consumers’ living rooms.
One way to enrich image viewing and sharing is to combine images with voice annotation and music.
A system should be developed for multimedia authoring, centered around and driven by still photos, with an emphasis on composing still images with sound, including music and spoken annotations. We describe the overall system, as well as major enabling technology components, including multimedia authoring, semantic image classification, and cross-media indexing.
The finished multimedia bit stream is primarily recorded on DVD or VCD to facilitate enriched enjoyment through a TV set, but can also be shared on a desktop/laptop, via email, or online.

project ideas

Posted in 06.Design Thinking & Sketching, 07.Fixation and Incubation, 08.Elite or Everyman on March 7, 2010 by sjtoday

I proposed two possible creativity project that I’m interested in.

First is about collaborative creativity, how a group of people create a creative product together.  In most part of past research are about how technology support the collaboration, what devices to enhance remote or co-located collaboration. However, the question I’m interested is the compare between individual and collaborative creativity. Does collaboration really generate more creativity than individual because of brain storming or what other factors? or the individual work will generate the best result in creativity? I’m thinking comparing the difference between individual and collaborative creativity and also what help in the process of product development in these two different sessions.

The other idea is about personal preference about creativity. I once read a paper about curious agent and artificial creativity. One of its experiment investigates the social behavior of groups of agents with
different hedonistic functions of low or high preferences for novelty. It explores groups of agents that communicate amongst themselves but rarely acknowledge the creativity of agents outside the groups. I’m just wondering if this would happen in human society other than simulation agents. Simply put, if people only interested in the creativity similar to their own, or people can accept generally accepted creative work. If a creative work is too creative to be accepted by its society, can it still be called a creative work?

I think the first one might be more feasible, I’m interested how it would be for the second idea, but it’s still very vague right now. Any comments or thoughts?

thanks,

-SJ

Project Proposal: Creativity and Intent, Lost in Translation?

Posted in 07.Fixation and Incubation on February 24, 2010 by karen mackay

I am interested in how we convey meaning to others through the process of creation. How do we communicate a message to another person without the meaning getting lost in translation? Can a person ever really fully explain their creative intent? Can we ever fully understand someone else’s vision?

I am considering creating a series of objects based on the descriptions of either existing objects or pure concepts. I will have a series of creative individuals give me a verbal/written description of an object and I will recreate that object without any of the associated imagery. Once the piece is complete I will allow myself to see the original concept or object. Through this process I want to explore how we communicate ideas to one another, and the ability to replicate what believe is being shown or told to us. What are the implications for this in terms of general human communication? What are the implications in terms of the client-designer relationship? Our job as designers is to interpret the vision, desires and needs of our clients. Is it possible to “see” what’s  in another person’s mind to create what they imagine?

There are lots of questions here. And the project itself may lead to more questions and less hard answers. But I am eager to go on this journey of creativity, creation and translation to see where it will lead.

-Karen

Project Proposal: Creativity and Narratives

Posted in 07.Fixation and Incubation on February 24, 2010 by Anupam Guha

As I am interested in storytelling AI systems, I would like to investigate various creativity inspired methodologies which can be used to artificially generate narratives. I am looking to write a paper, and do a literature study. Since I already have background in the AI related aspects of the problem, I do not intend this to be a programming exercise, rather I want to attack with the question ‘What goes on in the human mind when generating narratives?’

I would like partner(s), anyone who is interested in storytelling, and who feels that stories are an important aspect of human intelligence, and someone who looks at creativity as something which deserves to be scientifically studied and quantified. I am really keen on stories and would appreciate assistance of people who read books as if their life depended on them.

Ideas as to what we could investigate:

1. suspense generation in stories

2. Stories and imagery

3. Audience subconscious interactions

4. interactive stories

5. phantasmal effects of stories

6. planning problems

7. effects of subplots

etc

Insight, Fixation and Incubation

Posted in 07.Fixation and Incubation on February 24, 2010 by Shantanu

This is one paper that I found very interesting because it tries to find a protocol behind problem solving. It tries to tell us how to think and what to do when there is a problem to be solved and also which method is better suited (sudden restructuring of the problem or incremental retrieval of problem specific solutions). As far as I can tell neither one is the one and only solution. The way people go about trying to solve a problem depends entirely upon oneself. Some may like to just go and tackle the problem head on. Such people may make mistakes before arriving at a solution (trial and error) while others may like to think about the problem a bit more and come up with a solution at one go because they came up with a carefully evaluated idea when thinking over the problem and then everything fell in together (insight). The Gestalt psychologists and Weisberg used experiments that were too biased towards proving their own point. Neither one could explain each others findings based on their own ideologies although the Gestalt psychologists did not explicitly try to prove that trial and error was the wrong protocol to follow.

As far as the concept of fixation went I was particularly interested in the experiments conducted by Smith, Ward and Schumacher where there was a group of people who were asked to design something some people in the group were shown design examples whereas the others were not and they were clearly able to show that when people had a concept in mind, they will readily use this concept where required but if they do not have the required concept in mind, they try to become more creative and use whatever little knowledge they have to its fullest. But I think that if we were to represent a concept, we need to have a certain idea as to what it is. If we don’t have a clue as to what we are trying to do, we will not be able to go anywhere. This would mean that when talk about fixation, we don’t forget concepts. They are there somewhere in our minds but is inaccessible at that moment (subconscious) but becomes accessible at some other moment (conscious). But according to me , being creative is not the same as being correct. If people have the wrong idea of a concept, then they will make mistakes when asked to represent the concept.

07.Fixation and Incubation

Posted in 07.Fixation and Incubation on February 11, 2010 by Ellen Yi-Luen Do
  • Each person should work on their project proposals – to figure out whether you are writing a paper about something (what? a literature survey about child creativity and measurements, about personality and design collaborations, about design thinking, or about where people find inspirations, etc. etc.), conducting some sort of empirical studies (protocol analysis of design activities or meetings? interviews with practitioners? designing creativity support tools? using cultural probe to investigate daily life? etc etc), or inventing tangible artifact (software, hardware, website, toys, community portals, playground, etc. etc.) by any means.
  • Be prepared to have a story to tell in next week’s 3 minute madness session – which you can show up to 5 slides in 3 minutes to tell people what your research topics for this class will be, and how you plan to do it, are there precedents or related work? and what might we expect to see at the end of the semester.
  • Depending on people’s interests, we could adjust reading lists to better suit the class discussions and progress
  • Yes, you can decide to do it either as individual project or a joint team project (no more than 3 persons per team please.)
  • Here is the reading for this week – Chapter 7, Insight, Fixation, and Incubation in (eds) Ronald A. Finke , Thomas B. Ward and Steven M. Smith. MIT Press – find online reader here Creative Cognition (The book is interesting, and informative. Enjoy!)